Marianne Binetti Suggests Perfect Roses for Beginners

March 13, 2017

Northwest horticultural expert Marianne Binetti has been writing and talking about roses for many years – in her newspaper columns, her blog, for Lowes and as part of her “Dig In Seattle”program.  In a recent Marianne Binetti, On Gardening column in The Olympian, she wrote that “Every garden needs at last one rose plant.”

 

She goes on to tell her readers:

I love roses and everything that they represent. Love, beauty, and even passion. It is a plant that draws you to it, that loves to flower. Like a peacock showing its feathers, a rose in bloom will make you happy and feel good to be in its presence.

 

The Flower Carpet and other drought-and disease-resistant shrub roses have changed the way we care for roses and how many communities now landscape their public spaces. After decades of evergreen and ever-boring islands of junipers, the Pacific Northwest now blooms with roses along our highways, roses in traffic circles and, most importantly, roses are back in front yards, draping over picket fences, and in back yards flowering in patio pots. It was the Flower Carpet rose that made “no spray” organic gardeners return to rose-growing.

 

drought tolerant roses

Flower Carpet Red thrives in high heat!

If you’ve never grown roses or been a failure in the past, make this the year you plant a Flower Carpet rose. The brand comes in various shades of pink, red, white and my personal favorite, a rich gold-amber. These hard-to-kill roses are most often sold in containers, so you’ll find them for sale throughout the spring and into the summer. In my garden, the flower carpet roses produce blooms right until December, with no spraying, ever. Now that’s a nice pretty nice promise for a rose garden.

 

 

The original environmental rose®, Flower Carpet comes in a variety of great colors.  With its two-tiered root system, this easy care rose is drought tolerant once established.  The “next generation” varieties – Scarlet, Pink Supreme and Amber – have all been bred for additional heat and humidity tolerance.

 

Drought tolerant roses

For more about Marianne, her workshops, books and more, visit her website.

 

 

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